Disruptive Power of Google Glass

2

October 21, 2015 by idinnovation

Back in 2012, a disruption occurred in the market with the introduction of the Google Glass. People have been using handheld devices for some time now, however; the google glassGoogle Glass is the first in what will likely be a long list of wearable computers (Rosenblum, 2014). A disruption occurs when something may be occurring one way and then suddenly a new way is introduced and knows the previous method out (Laureate Education, 2014).

The introduction of the Google Glass was so dynamic one might not see the point in providing a description of what Google Glass is; Solis stated “Google Glass didn’t just trickle out into the world. Instead, it exploded with the kind of fuss and pageantry usually reserved for an Apple iSomething” (2015). O (Solis, 2015). In 2015, Google Glass has officially been pulled and is back in production and just like that “Poof! Gone. All that fanfare for nothing” (Bilton, 2015).

Google Glass is a small, unobtrusive piece of eyewear that resemble glasses and allows the wearer to see the web and be online all the time. Rosenblum (2014) contends that while the glasses are wearable he likes to refer to them as embeddable as the wearer is google-glass“embedded” in the web all the time while they are being worn. Users can add text, video, photos and live streaming that can all be uploaded and shared with the world immediately and at no cost (Rosenblum, 2014).

Solis (2015) referred to the demise of the Google Glass as a “ctrl alt del” and contends that wearables will struggle to find their place in the lives of everyday consumers. While they are cute and trendy the wearable market that includes items are worn on the wrist, neck, and fingers as an industry and market are incredibly immature (Solis, 2015). So then what happens with the Google Glass? Bilton (2015) contends that the product is going to be redesigned under new leadership from scratch and will not be released until it is complete.

So then what does this mean about disruptive technology? It means that disruptive technologies are a powerful force that is unpredictable. The emergence of innovative technologies doesn’t make it unsusceptible to unanticipated disruptive technology wild cards (Laureate Education, 2014).

References
Bilton, N. (2015, February 4). Why Google Glass Broke – The New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/05/style/why-google-glass-broke.html?_r=0

Laureate Education (Producer). (2014). David Thornburg: Disruptive technologies [Video file]. Baltimore, MD: Author.

Rosenblum, M. (2014, March 7). Google Glass and the power of technology to change the world | Media Network | The Guardian. Retrieved from http://www.theguardian.com/media-network/michaels-rosenblog/2014/mar/07/google-glass-technology-changing-world

Solis, B. (2015, January 19). 25 Disruptive Technology Trends for 2015 – 2016 – Brian Solis. Retrieved from http://www.briansolis.com/2015/01/25-disruptive-technology-trends-2015-2016/

 

 

 

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2 thoughts on “Disruptive Power of Google Glass

  1. Paul Hodgson says:

    Nice article Sharifa. Google Glass is currently in development of version 2 for enterprises as a result of privacy concerns of the masses. Do you think that that same concerns will be a problem for the next version?

  2. Yali says:

    Hi Sharifa,
    Great discussion on the disruptive power of Google Glass! Kalinauckas (2015) pointed out the problems with Google Glass: expensiveness, short battery life, unappealing image, personalization, privacy, and limited application. However, the new development of Glass at Work may find a special market for Glass in enterprises. For example, doctors may use it for surgery streaming, and police may wear it for live feed (Kalinauckas, 2015).
    Reference
    Kalinauckas, A. (2015). 7 problems with Google Glass. Retrieved from http://eandt.theiet.org/magazine/2015/02/google-glass.cfm

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